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Feb
05

Infamous Studio

About Us

Established in 2004, Infamous Studio is built on over twenty five years of international tattooing experience.In providing high quality custom and classic tattooing we have earned a solid reputation within our local and the international tattoo community.With our professional and knowledgeable staff and unique environment we work hard to deliver the goods for a lifetime of satisfaction.

State regulated hygiene standards are maintained.

* Please Note; You must come in to make appointments, we dont provide price quotes via telephone or email. We prefer face to face interaction.

We are located on the island of Sdermalm in Stockholm, in the SoFo area- bars, restaurants, cafes, shopping and artsy shit.

Our doors are open to the serious collector & novices alike.

Most work and consultations are done by appointment, however we can often be caught for a drop-in.

Come as you are, we’ll help you change that!

– Please arrive on time for your appointment.- It is recommended to rest well and to of eaten prior to your appointment.- It is not recommended to bring a bunch of friends with you when you get tattooed, only you can come into the working areas.- If you have children it is best that they dont accompany you when you are to be tattooed.- We do not tattoo anyone under the age of 18, bring ID.- We do not tolerate drunks or people otherwise intoxicated.- You must give 48 hours notice to change or cancel you appointment in order to receive a refund of your booking fee. Our time is as valuable as yours.

Leave a bandage on until the following morning or 8-12 hours.Remove bandage & wash thoroughly warm water & mild soap.Gently pat dry with clean towel. Do not re-bandage.Clean tattoo with water 2 or 3 times throughout the 1st day.Use soap only if necessary.Do not apply any lotion/cream for the first day-the tattoo must have air.

For the next 7-14 days with clean hands lightly apply perfume free lotion/cream 2-3 times daily.You can use less, but not more.The tattoo must not feel wet or dry.Continue as above until healed.

Your tattoo will scab & peel lightly.It will be in the colors of the tattoo & look similar to fish food as it flakes off- this is completely normal.

-WHILE YOUR TATTOO IS HEALING-Do not pick at your tattoo! Picking and scratching at your tattoo will damage it!

Do not sunburn, sauna, swim or exercise strenuously with your fresh tattoo.

No wool, polyester or tight fitting clothing directly against your new tattoo.

Do not listen to tattoo experts in bars or on the street.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, CALL US: 08 604 4066

Visit link:
Infamous Studio

Feb
01

Tattoos and Your Mission – lds.org

Not only are tattoos a defacement of your body, but getting one could affect your ability to go on a mission.

Imagine you are standing outside a beautiful white temple. Its walls and grounds are immaculate. On the lawn near the front door is a painter. He has displays of his art for all to see.

A few minutes later, you see this painter turn around, pull out cans of paint, and start to paint on the walls of the temple. His painting isnt ugly, but it just doesnt belong there. Do you say anything to him? Do you ask him to make his picture bigger and more colorful and offer to pay him for his work? Or do you say, You cant do that! This is a holy temple!?

What would you do if it were your temple? The Apostle Paul said, Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? For the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are (1 Cor. 3:1617).

A tattoo is graffiti on the temple of the body, said President Gordon B. Hinckley.1

Tattoos are permanent. They are not only physically damaging, but through disobedience to the voice of the prophets, choosing to get one causes spiritual damage also. On top of that, something you might not have thought about before is that having a tattoo will affect your application to be a missionary.

When Bobby Collins (name has been changed) sent his mission papers off, he was surprised that he did not get back a large white envelope containing his mission call. Instead, he received a letter from the Churchs Missionary Department asking about his tattoo.

When Bobby graduated from high school, he wasnt sure if he wanted to go on a mission. He moved away from home to work, and he liked the independence of not having his parents around all the time. At about the same time, his best friend and his cousin both got tattoos. That kind of lowered my guard, he says.

Bobby had always been good at art, so he designed his own tattoo. He knew tattoos were discouraged by the Church and that his mother wouldnt like it, and before he went to get it, he asked his brother what he thought about it. His brother had some good advice. He said, Life already gives us so many scars. Why would you want another one?

But Bobby had already made up his mind. Six weeks and 700 hard-earned dollars later, he had a huge tattoo all the way up one leg. It was really painful. It was bloody, he remembers. And getting one made it easier to think about getting more. He didnt get any more, but after strengthening his testimony of the gospel, he did decide he wanted to serve a mission.

As painful as getting his tattoo was, the pain of regret that Bobby felt was much worse. He was very worried about whether or not he would be able to serve a mission. He wanted to get the tattoo removed but couldnt afford to. He worried what his future spouse and children might think of it.

That letter from the Missionary Department scared me a lot, Bobby says. My biggest fear was that this one thing was going to hold me back from serving a mission.

Bobby had to do what the Missionary Department asks all missionary applicants who have tattoos to do. On his original application he told them a little about his tattoo. The letter he received later requested a few more details, including an explanation of when and why he got it and where it is located on the body as well as a description or photograph of it. He was also asked to describe how he felt about it.

When a missionary candidate with a tattoo applies, General Authorities review each case and decide whether that candidate will be allowed to serve a mission. Some cannot.

Bobby did receive his mission call. He is grateful to be a missionary and sorry that, now a representative of the Lords Church, he once decided to get a tattoo.

For some missionaries, having a tattoo means being assigned to serve in a place where their tattoo is either culturally accepted or to a colder climate where long sleeves, and tights for women, will cover their tattoos. A tattoo can limit not only where you can serve, but, depending on its content and your feelings about it, it could also determine whether you can serve at all.

I just hope people will follow President Hinckleys counsel, Bobby says. I know that he is a prophet of God. If he says its important, then its important.

Bobby has some counsel of his own too, the same counsel his brother gave him: Even though we can be forgiven through the Atonement, why do something else thats going to leave us scarred?

You are a child of God. Your body is His creation. Would you disfigure that creation with portrayals of people, animals, and words painted into your skin?

I promise you that the time will come, if you have tattoos, that you will regret your actions. They cannot be washed off. They are permanent. Only by an expensive and painful process can they be removed. If you are tattooed, then probably for the remainder of your life you will carry it with you. I believe the time will come when it will be an embarrassment to you. Avoid it. We, as your Brethren who love you, plead with you not to become so disrespectful of the body which the Lord has given you. President Gordon B. Hinckley, A Prophets Counsel and Prayer for Youth, Liahona, Apr. 2001, 37.

Inna Prokopenko is a registered nurse and licensed master aesthetician in Salt Lake City, Utah. She has attempted to remove many tattoos in her years of work. Here is some of what Inna has to say about tattoos:

View original post here:
Tattoos and Your Mission – lds.org

Feb
01

Tattoos and Your Mission – liahona

Imagine you are standing outside a beautiful white temple. Its walls and grounds are immaculate. On the lawn near the front door is a painter. He has displays of his art for all to see.

A few minutes later, you see this painter turn around, pull out cans of paint, and start to paint on the walls of the temple. His painting isnt ugly, but it just doesnt belong there. Do you say anything to him? Do you ask him to make his picture bigger and more colorful and offer to pay him for his work? Or do you say, You cant do that! This is a holy temple!?

What would you do if it were your temple? The Apostle Paul said, Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? For the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are (1 Cor. 3:1617).

A tattoo is graffiti on the temple of the body, said President Gordon B. Hinckley.1

Tattoos are permanent. They are not only physically damaging, but through disobedience to the voice of the prophets, choosing to get one causes spiritual damage also. On top of that, something you might not have thought about before is that having a tattoo will affect your application to be a missionary.

When Bobby Collins (name has been changed) sent his mission papers off, he was surprised that he did not get back a large white envelope containing his mission call. Instead, he received a letter from the Churchs Missionary Department asking about his tattoo.

When Bobby graduated from high school, he wasnt sure if he wanted to go on a mission. He moved away from home to work, and he liked the independence of not having his parents around all the time. At about the same time, his best friend and his cousin both got tattoos. That kind of lowered my guard, he says.

Bobby had always been good at art, so he designed his own tattoo. He knew tattoos were discouraged by the Church and that his mother wouldnt like it, and before he went to get it, he asked his brother what he thought about it. His brother had some good advice. He said, Life already gives us so many scars. Why would you want another one?

But Bobby had already made up his mind. Six weeks and 700 hard-earned dollars later, he had a huge tattoo all the way up one leg. It was really painful. It was bloody, he remembers. And getting one made it easier to think about getting more. He didnt get any more, but after strengthening his testimony of the gospel, he did decide he wanted to serve a mission.

As painful as getting his tattoo was, the pain of regret that Bobby felt was much worse. He was very worried about whether or not he would be able to serve a mission. He wanted to get the tattoo removed but couldnt afford to. He worried what his future spouse and children might think of it.

That letter from the Missionary Department scared me a lot, Bobby says. My biggest fear was that this one thing was going to hold me back from serving a mission.

Bobby had to do what the Missionary Department asks all missionary applicants who have tattoos to do. On his original application he told them a little about his tattoo. The letter he received later requested a few more details, including an explanation of when and why he got it and where it is located on the body as well as a description or photograph of it. He was also asked to describe how he felt about it.

When a missionary candidate with a tattoo applies, General Authorities review each case and decide whether that candidate will be allowed to serve a mission. Some cannot.

Bobby did receive his mission call. He is grateful to be a missionary and sorry that, now a representative of the Lords Church, he once decided to get a tattoo.

For some missionaries, having a tattoo means being assigned to serve in a place where their tattoo is either culturally accepted or to a colder climate where long sleeves, and tights for women, will cover their tattoos. A tattoo can limit not only where you can serve, but, depending on its content and your feelings about it, it could also determine whether you can serve at all.

I just hope people will follow President Hinckleys counsel, Bobby says. I know that he is a prophet of God. If he says its important, then its important.

Bobby has some counsel of his own too, the same counsel his brother gave him: Even though we can be forgiven through the Atonement, why do something else thats going to leave us scarred?

You are a child of God. Your body is His creation. Would you disfigure that creation with portrayals of people, animals, and words painted into your skin?

I promise you that the time will come, if you have tattoos, that you will regret your actions. They cannot be washed off. They are permanent. Only by an expensive and painful process can they be removed. If you are tattooed, then probably for the remainder of your life you will carry it with you. I believe the time will come when it will be an embarrassment to you. Avoid it. We, as your Brethren who love you, plead with you not to become so disrespectful of the body which the Lord has given you.President Gordon B. Hinckley, A Prophets Counsel and Prayer for Youth, Liahona, Apr. 2001, 37.

Inna Prokopenko is a registered nurse and licensed master aesthetician in Salt Lake City, Utah. She has attempted to remove many tattoos in her years of work. Here is some of what Inna has to say about tattoos:

Physical Risks

One big physical risk of getting a tattoo is ink allergies. They can develop right away or in six months to a year after someone is tattooed. Ink allergies make the tattooed part of your body swell up and get red and itchy. If you are allergic and ink gets into your bloodstream, you could become very ill.

Blood-borne illnesses are another risk. If needles and other equipment are not properly sterilized, it is possible to get HIV or other illnesses.

Removals

Regret for being tattooed is more than a riskit is a certainty for all of Innas patients. Many people try to get tattoos removed so they can look more professional at their jobs or to show a good example to their children.

Laser tattoo removal can remove some tattoosat least partiallybut removal is much more painful than getting tattooed in the first place.

Laser treatments dont usually cause scarring, but there is a possibility.

Yellow tattoos or tattoos using yellow inks cannot be removed without surgery.

Removal treatments take a long time and are very expensivemuch more expensive than getting the tattoo.

Photograph by David Stoker, posed by model

See the original post here:
Tattoos and Your Mission – liahona

Feb
01

Symbol of Sacrifice, Monument to Life – ensign

This year, the entire Church celebrates the one hundredth anniversary of the completion and dedication of the Salt Lake Temple. That sacred edifice was dedicated on 6 April 1893, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, to carry out the holy purposes of our Eternal Father. It stands proudly today as a marvelous monument to the dauntless dedication of humble pioneers as they sought to serve the God of heaven. Many of those who saw its beginningincluding Presidents Brigham Young and John Taylornever with their mortal eyes saw it finished.

Millennia ago, the prophet Micah predicted the following:

But in the last days it shall come to pass, that the mountain of the house of the Lord shall be established in the top of the mountains, and it shall be exalted above the hills; and people shall flow unto it.

And many nations shall come, and say, Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, and to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of his ways, and we will walk in his paths: for the law shall go forth of Zion, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.1

No doubt the building of the Salt Lake Temple was in partial fulfillment of Micahs prophecy.

Here we may ask ourselves why the Saintswho had already been driven from their homes (and temples) at Kirtland and Nauvoowould be so willing, even eager, to build another temple.

I believe the answer lies in their conviction that the Lord had commanded them to build it so they could receive the ordinances of salvation therein, for the Lord had said to the Prophet Joseph Smith on 19 January 1841 that the Saints must build a house unto my name, that I may reveal mine ordinances therein unto my people;

For I deign to reveal unto my church things which have been kept hid from before the foundation of the world.2

I am convinced those rugged pioneers knew in their hearts that the ordinances of the temple would actually bind (seal) them to their spouses, children, and parents (living and dead) and provide them an eternal home in the presence of our Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ.

Just four days after the first pioneers arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, President Brigham Young walked with Heber C. Kimball, Willard Richards, Orson Pratt, Wilford Woodruff, and several others to a section of land located between two creeks in the heart of the valley, waved his hand over the site, and said, Here is the forty acres [later reduced to ten acres] for the temple.3 Another account states that he stood upon the spot where now rises the magnificent Salt Lake Temple, and exclaimed to his brother Apostles and companions: Here we will build the Temple of our God!4

Construction began in 1853. The temple was to be built according to a divine plan; President Young testified later that he had first seen it in vision as he stood on the temple site not long after the Saints arrived in the valley.5 But translating that design to earthly stone and mortar was to be no short-term project completed according to a planned-out construction schedule, as our temples now are. Instead, completion of the Salt Lake Temple would be a goal, a dream, and a motive for sacrifice by two generations of Latter-day Saints! Interrupted at times, they toiled on despite physical difficulties, despite civil difficulties6, undeterred in their efforts because they were building for the ages. By early 1892, as the exterior of the sacred building neared completion, any observer could see that this magnificent house of God would also be a monument to the faith and dedication of a people.

The date of 6 April 1892 was set for the laying of the capstone of the temple, and as that day drew near, the wave of joy which swept over the heart of the Saints was visible in all their associations. It was to them a day of triumph for which they had patiently toiled, many of them the greater part of a lifetime.7

The capstone was laid by President Wilford Woodruff (who, before becoming President of the Church, had served from 1877 to 1881 as the first president of the St. George Temple, the first one completed by Latter-day Saints in the Mountain West). Thousands gathered to observe the capstone laying. Afterward, President Woodruff wrote in his journal that it was the largest assembly I ever saw meet on any occasion of the Latter-day Saints. This was certainly the greatest day the Latter-day Saints ever saw in these mountains.8

But a greater day than this was to followthe glorious day of the temples dedication on 6 April 1893. On that historic day, some twenty-five hundred people were gathered in the upper assembly room of the temple for the first dedicatory session. President Wilford Woodruff offered the dedicatory prayer. All three members of the First Presidency spoke. Then came the awe-inspiring, sacred Hosannah Shout, led by Lorenzo Snow, with the entire audience standing upon their feet and waving white handkerchiefs in concert.9

In the dedicatory prayer, President Woodruff asked the Lord to bless the Saints and to accept this building in all its parts from foundation to capstone that it might be the abode of thy Well-Beloved Son, our Savior. He asked the Lord to remember all those who have labored in erection of this house, or who have, in any way, by their means or influence aided in its completion.10

He told the congregation at a later dedication session that a Heavenly Host were in attendance at the [first] dedication [service] and if the eyes of the congregation could [have been] opened they would [have seen] Joseph and Hyrum [Smith], Brigham Young, John Taylor and all other good men who had lived in this dispensation assembled with us; as also Esaias, Jeremiah, and all the holy Prophets and Apostles who had prophesied of the latter-day work. They were rejoicing with us in this building which had been accepted of the Lord, and the shout of Hosanna which had arisen from this House of God had reached the throne of the Almighty.11

The glorious, long-awaited day had come at last!

Dedication services were repeated until all worthy Saints who desired had an opportunity to attend and participate. The final dedication session was on Monday, April 24. Thirty-one services provided opportunity for eighty-two thousand people to participate in presenting their temple to their God.12

President Lorenzo Snow was called to serve as the first president of the Salt Lake Temple, and ordinance work commenced on 22 May 1893. In the one hundred years that have followed, nearly 600,000 members have received their own endowments there, and the number of sealings of living couples now stands at nearly 280,000, while millions of our ancestors have received vicariously their sacred temple ordinances.

No doubt millions more will yet receive their temple ordinances in the Salt Lake Temple. Brigham Young said in 1863 that he wanted to see the Temple built in a manner that it will endure through the Millennium.13

Several years following completion of the Salt Lake Temple, Elder J. Golden Kimball said:

When I think about [the temple], every stone in it is a sermon to me. It tells of suffering, it tells of sacrifice, it preachesevery rock in it, preaches a discourse. When it was dedicated, it seemed to me that it was the greatest sermon that has ever been preached since the Sermon on the Mount. Every window, every steeple, everything about the Temple speaks of the things of God, and gives evidence of the faith of the people who built it.14

Elder B. H. Roberts reflected on the meaning of the temple for him during a Church conference in 1928:

Whenever I pass this temple, walk alongside of it and contemplate its towers, its architectural beauty I hold it as sacred in my heart as I look upon it; and I have another thought in connection with it, and that is that it is a mass testimony of a whole people, a testimony to the world that God has spoken, and that he has revealed his truths once more for the salvation of men and has ushered in the dispensation of the fulness of times. It is a community testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and becomes a witness wherever its architectural beauty is published to the world. I love the temple as a testimony to the world of Gods great new dispensation of his gospel.15

To these testimonies, I add my own testimony. God did inspire his prophet Brigham Young to build the Salt Lake Temple. President Young saw the temple in vision and was able to instruct Truman O. Angell, the architect, as to its design.

When we look at succession in the presidency of the Salt Lake Temple, we learn much about the place of this great house of the Lord in the latter-day kingdom. While Lorenzo Snow served as its president, between 1893 and 1898, he was also serving as President of the Quorum of the Twelve. His successor, Joseph F. Smith, served as Second Counselor in the First Presidency (under President Lorenzo Snow) during the first three years that he was the temple president. Then, from 1901 until 1911, President Smith served as both President of the Church and president of the Salt Lake Temple. In 1911, President Smiths First Counselor in the First Presidency, Anthon H. Lund, succeeded him as temple president. President Lund served until his death in 1921; after President Joseph F. Smith died in 1918, President Lund was named as First Counselor to President Heber J. Grant in the First Presidency, but retained his assignment as president of the temple.

This situation is unique in Church history. In no other temple did the President of the Churchor even a counselor in the First Presidencyalso preside directly over a temple. But the work of this great temple was so significant to these men that they were willing to carry the additional responsibility of presiding over it and looking after its operationin essence going to the temple each morning and taking care of business there before going to do the work of the First Presidency of the Church.

Presidents of the Church in our dispensation, from Joseph Smith to Ezra Taft Benson, have received and exercised the priesthood keys of the kingdom, including the keys which authorized them to perform in the holy temples of God the ordinances essential for the salvation of both the living and the dead. Those ordinances, which center on our Savior Jesus Christ and his divine mission, can be had in no other place.

Reflecting upon the Salt Lake Temple this centennial year, our hearts are inspired and touched by the willing sacrifices and unbending faith of those pioneer Saints who built it. Should we not then also be willingeven anxiousto make whatever sacrifices are necessary in our own lives to worthily enter a temple of the Lord? Should we not be eager, as they were, to receive our own temple blessings, to be sealed as families, and to provide those same saving ordinances for our ancestors?16 Then, as we keep the sacred covenants entered into in the Lords house here on earth, we may eventually become perfect and inherit a place with him in the eternal worlds.

Picture electronically composed by Charlie Baird and Scott Welty from historic and current photos

Photo by Welden Andersen

Photo by John Luke

Link:
Symbol of Sacrifice, Monument to Life – ensign

Feb
01

Education

Education is an important part of Heavenly Fathers plan to help you become more like Him. He wants you to educate your mind and to develop your skills and talents, your power to act well in your responsibilities, and your capacity to appreciate life. The education you gain will be valuable to you during mortality and in the life to come.

Education will prepare you for greater service in the world and in the Church. It will help you better provide for yourself, your family, and those in need. It will also help you be a wise counselor and companion to your future spouse and an informed and effective teacher of your future children.

Education is an investment that brings great rewards and will open the doors of opportunity that may otherwise be closed to you. Plan now to obtain an education. Be willing to work diligently and make sacrifices if necessary. Share your educational goals with your family, friends, and leaders so they can support and encourage you.

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Maintain an enthusiasm for learning throughout your life. Find joy in continuing to learn and in expanding your interests. Choose to actively participate in the learning opportunities available to you.

Your education should include spiritual learning. Study the scriptures and the words of the latter-day prophets. Participate in seminary and institute. Continue throughout your life to learn about Heavenly Fathers plan. This spiritual learning will help you find answers to the challenges of life and will invite the companionship of the Holy Ghost.

How can an education benefit me and my future family?

See the article here:
Education

Feb
01

Protect the Children – By Elder Dallin H. Oaks

We can all remember our feelings when a little child cried out and reached up to us for help. A loving Heavenly Father gives us those feelings to impel us to help His children. Please recall those feelings as I speak about our responsibility to protect and act for the well-being of children.

I speak from the perspective of the gospel of Jesus Christ, including His plan of salvation. That is my calling. Local Church leaders have responsibility for a single jurisdiction, like a ward or stake, but an Apostle is responsible to witness to the entire world. In every nation, of every race and creed, all children are children of God.

Although I do not speak in terms of politics or public policy, like other Church leaders, I cannot speak for the welfare of children without implications for the choices being made by citizens, public officials, and workers in private organizations. We are all under the Saviors command to love and care for each other and especially for the weak and defenseless.

Children are highly vulnerable. They have little or no power to protect or provide for themselves and little influence on so much that is vital to their well-being. Children need others to speak for them, and they need decision makers who put their well-being ahead of selfish adult interests.

Worldwide, we are shocked at the millions of children victimized by evil adult crimes and selfishness.

In some war-torn countries, children are abducted to serve as soldiers in contending armies.

A United Nations report estimates that over two million children are victimized each year through prostitution and pornography.1

From the perspective of the plan of salvation, one of the most serious abuses of children is to deny them birth. This is a worldwide trend. The national birthrate in the United States is the lowest in 25 years,2 and the birthrates in most European and Asian countries have been below replacement levels for many years. This is not just a religious issue. As rising generations diminish in numbers, cultures and even nations are hollowed out and eventually disappear.

One cause of the diminishing birthrate is the practice of abortion. Worldwide, there are estimated to be more than 40 million abortions per year.3 Many laws permit or even promote abortion, but to us this is a great evil. Other abuses of children that occur during pregnancy are the fetal impairments that result from the mothers inadequate nutrition or drug use.

There is a tragic irony in the multitude of children eliminated or injured before birth while throngs of infertile couples long for and seek babies to adopt.

Childhood abuses or neglect of children that occur after birth are more publicly visible. Worldwide, almost eight million children die before their fifth birthday, mostly from diseases both treatable and preventable.4 And the World Health Organization reports that one in four children have stunted growth, mentally and physically, because of inadequate nutrition.5 Living and traveling internationally, we Church leaders see much of this. The general presidency of the Primary report children living in conditions beyond our imaginations. A mother in the Philippines said: Sometimes we do not have enough money for food, but that is all right because it gives me the opportunity to teach my children about faith. We gather and pray for relief, and the children see the Lord bless us.6 In South Africa, a Primary worker met a little girl, lonely and sad. In faint responses to loving questions, she said she had no mother, no father, and no grandmotheronly a grandfather to care for her.7 Such tragedies are common on a continent where many caregivers have died of AIDS.

Even in rich nations little children and youth are impaired by neglect. Children growing up in poverty have inferior health care and inadequate educational opportunities. They are also exposed to dangerous environments in their physical and cultural surroundings and even from the neglect of their parents. Elder JeffreyR. Holland recently shared the experience of an LDS police officer. In an investigation he found five young children huddled together and trying to sleep without bedding on a filthy floor in a dwelling where their mother and others were drinking and partying. The apartment had no food to relieve their hunger. After tucking the children into a makeshift bed, the officer knelt and prayed for their protection. As he walked toward the door, one of them, about six, pursued him, grabbed him by the hand, and pleaded, Will you please adopt me?8

We remember our Saviors teaching as He placed a little child before His followers and declared:

And whoso shall receive one such little child in my name receiveth me.

But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea (Matthew 18:56).

When we consider the dangers from which children should be protected, we should also include psychological abuse. Parents or other caregivers or teachers or peers who demean, bully, or humiliate children or youth can inflict harm more permanent than physical injury. Making a child or youth feel worthless, unloved, or unwanted can inflict serious and long-lasting injury on his or her emotional well-being and development.9 Young people struggling with any exceptional condition, including same-gender attraction, are particularly vulnerable and need loving understandingnot bullying or ostracism.10

With the help of the Lord, we can repent and change and be more loving and helpful to childrenour own and those around us.

There are few examples of physical or emotional threats to children as important as those arising out of their relationships with their parents or guardians. President ThomasS. Monson has spoken of what he called the vile deeds of child abuse, where a parent has broken or disfigured a child, physically or emotionally.11 I grieved as I had to study the shocking evidence of such cases during my service on the Utah Supreme Court.

Of utmost importance to the well-being of children is whether their parents were married, the nature and duration of the marriage, and, more broadly, the culture and expectations of marriage and child care where they live. Two scholars of the family explain: Throughout history, marriage has first and foremost been an institution for procreation and raising children. It has provided the cultural tie that seeks to connect the father to his children by binding him to the mother of his children. Yet in recent times, children have increasingly been pushed from center stage.12

A Harvard law professor describes the current law and attitude toward marriage and divorce: The [current] American story about marriage, as told in the law and in much popular literature, goes something like this: marriage is a relationship that exists primarily for the fulfillment of the individual spouses. If it ceases to perform this function, no one is to blame and either spouse may terminate it at will. Children hardly appear in the story; at most they are rather shadowy characters in the background.13

Our Church leaders have taught that looking upon marriage as a mere contract that may be entered into at pleasure and severed at the first difficulty is an evil meriting severe condemnation, especially where children are made to suffer.14 And children are impacted by divorces. Over half of the divorces in a recent year involved couples with minor children.15

Many children would have had the blessing of being raised by both of their parents if only their parents had followed this inspired teaching in the family proclamation: Husband and wife have a solemn responsibility to love and care for each other and for their children. Parents have a sacred duty to rear their children in love and righteousness, to provide for their physical and spiritual needs, and to teach them to love and serve one another.16 The most powerful teaching of children is by the example of their parents. Divorcing parents inevitably teach a negative lesson.

There are surely cases when a divorce is necessary for the good of the children, but those circumstances are exceptional.17 In most marital contests the contending parents should give much greater weight to the interests of the children. With the help of the Lord, they can do so. Children need the emotional and personal strength that come from being raised by two parents who are united in their marriage and their goals. As one who was raised by a widowed mother, I know firsthand that this cannot always be achieved, but it is the ideal to be sought whenever possible.

Children are the first victims of current laws permitting so-called no-fault divorce. From the standpoint of children, divorce is too easy. Summarizing decades of social science research, a careful scholar concluded that the family structure that produces the best outcomes for children, on average, are two biological parents who remain married.18 A New York Times writer noted the striking fact that even as traditional marriage has declined in the United States the evidence has mounted for the institutions importance to the well-being of children.19 That reality should give important guidance to parents and parents-to-be in their decisions involving marriage and divorce. We also need politicians, policy makers, and officials to increase their attention to what is best for children in contrast to the selfish interests of voters and vocal advocates of adult interests.

Children are also victimized by marriages that do not occur. Few measures of the welfare of our rising generation are more disturbing than the recent report that 41 percent of all births in the United States were to women who were not married.20 Unmarried mothers have massive challenges, and the evidence is clear that their children are at a significant disadvantage when compared with children raised by married parents.21

Most of the children born to unmarried mothers58 percentwere born to couples who were cohabitating.22 Whatever we may say about these couples forgoing marriage, studies show that their children suffer significant comparative disadvantages.23 For children, the relative stability of marriage matters.

We should assume the same disadvantages for children raised by couples of the same gender. The social science literature is controversial and politically charged on the long-term effect of this on children, principally because, as a New York Times writer observed, same-sex marriage is a social experiment, and like most experiments it will take time to understand its consequences.24

I have spoken for childrenchildren everywhere. Some may reject some of these examples, but none should resist the plea that we unite to increase our concern for the welfare and future of our childrenthe rising generation.

We are speaking of the children of God, and with His powerful help, we can do more to help them. In this plea I address not only Latter-day Saints but also all persons of religious faith and others who have a value system that causes them to subordinate their own needs to those of others, especially to the welfare of children.25

Religious persons are also conscious of the Saviors New Testament teaching that pure little children are our role models of humility and teachableness:

Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.

Whosoever therefore shall humble himself as this little child, the same is greatest in the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 18:34).

In the Book of Mormon we read of the risen Lord teaching the Nephites that they must repent and be baptized and become as a little child or they could not inherit the kingdom of God (3Nephi 11:38; see also Moroni 8:10).

I pray that we will humble ourselves as little children and reach out to protect our little children, for they are the future for us, for our Church, and for our nations. In the name of Jesus Christ, amen.

Link:
Protect the Children – By Elder Dallin H. Oaks

Feb
01

Consecrated Life – usccb.org

World Day for Consecrated LifePrayer Card – View or downloadthe pdf version to print out andshare with family and friends.

The Committee on Clergy, Consecrated Life and Vocations seeks to foster and encourage the various forms of consecrated life in the Church today. In Vita Consecrata, the 1996 Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation, Saint John Paul II wrote of the different forms of consecrated life as “the many branches which sinks its roots into the Gospel and brings forth abundant fruit in every season of the Church’s life.” These diverse forms include: Monastic Life, the Orders of Virgins, Hermits, and Institutes completely devoted to contemplation, Apostolic Religious Life, Secular Institutes, Societies of Apostolic Life, and new or renewed forms of the consecrated life (cf. Vita Consecrata, 6-12). Each form is described in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

What’s it like to enter religious life from the secular world? Watch a postulant for the Sisters Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary discuss the transition.

Celebrated in Parishes February 2-3, 2019

In 1997, Saint John Paul II instituted a day of prayer for women and men in consecrated life. This celebration is attached to the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord on February 2. This feast is also known as Candlemas Day; the day on which candles are blessed symbolizing Christ who is the light of the world. So too, those in consecrated life are called to reflect the light of Jesus Christ to all peoples. The celebration of World Day for Consecrated Life is transferred to the following Sunday in order to highlight the gift of consecrated persons for the whole Church.

World Day for Consecrated Life Page

The United States Association of Consecrated Virgins (USACV) represents women living in the world who have made the vow of consecrated virginity.

More:
Consecrated Life – usccb.org

Jan
30

Body Art – Hawaiian and Polynesian tattooing

Body Art

by Betty Fullard-Leo

Images: The copperline engravings of the Polynesians originated from sketches done by european artists visiting various islands in the South Pacific during the early 1800’s.

Queen Kamamalu had a tattoo applied to her tongue as an expression of her deep grief when her mother-in-law died in the 1820s. Missionary William Ellis watched the procedure, commenting to the queen that she must be undergoing great pain. The queen replied, He eha nui no, he nui roa ra kuu aroha. (Great pain indeed, greater is my affection.)

Early explorers found that both men and women wore tattoos in old Hawaii for a variety of reasons. Sometimes the tattoos were purely decorative. Jacques Arago, who visited the Islands in 1819 as a draftsman with the Freycinet expedition, noted that some men were heavily tattooed on only one side of their bodies. He wrote, They looked like men half burnt, or daubed with ink, from the top of the head to the sole of the foot. Hawaiian historian Samuel Kamakau noted that this solid black tattooing was called pahupahu. It was commonly applied to warriors in the Marquesas as a disguise, and it is thought that such tattooing may have set apart Hawaiian warriors as well.

Oral traditions tell of warriors defeated in battle who were taken prisoner, then beaten and tattooed. As a final indignity, their eyelids were turned up and tattooed on the inside, called maka uhi. Sometimes outcasts born into the kauwa (slave) class were permanently marked with a curved line above the bridge of the nose, or a circular spot in the middle of the forehead, with curved lines like brackets on either side of the eyes.

Tattooing was an art unknown in the western world prior to Captain Cooks first voyage through Polynesia. The word tattoo is one of only a few words used internationally that have a Polynesian origin coming from the word tatau used in Tahiti, Tonga, and Samoa. In Hawaii the word became kakau.

Interestingly, tattoo designs are thought to supply one more clue to the origin of the Polynesian peoples, as they bear close resemblance to the geometrical designs found on Lapita pottery. The Lapita people originated in Melanesia and Southeast Asia about 3,000 B.C., and early Lapita voyagers reached Tonga about 1,300 B.C., later settling Samoa and eastward into the Pacific. Shards of pottery they carried with them have been found throughout the Pacific, pottery whose curvilinear and rectilinear shapes, spirals, chevrons and interlocking elements are so similar to Polynesian tattoo designs, historians are certain there was an ancient connection. Even stylized masks and sea creatures appeared on Lapita pottery, as it did in early Polynesian tattoo forms.

Other Hawaiian tattoo designs might depict squares, triangles, crescents and figures of aumakua (personal gods), such as the lizard or shark. As recently as 1923, publisher Lorin Thurston told of seeing a woman with a row of triangular dots around her ankle as a charm against sharks, applied because a legend tells of a woman who was bitten by her aumakua, a shark. When the woman cried out that he was supposed to protect her, the shark let her go and replied, I will not make that mistake again, for I will see the marks on your ankle.

After Western contact, tattoo designs evolved to include more fanciful shapes such as figures of birds, goats, fans, guns, etc. When King Kamehameha died, many Hawaiians had Kamehameha, 1819 tattooed on themselves to show their respect for the great king.

Tattoos were applied with needles, sometimes made of beaks and claws of birds, but more often made of the knife-like barbs on the sides of the tails of certain fish, such as palani, kala and pualu. Some bones were split to form double pointed needles. Some were grooved from the base to the point of the barb with the dull upper end wrapped in fiber to hold ink in reserve. Needles could be bound together to form multi-points when large areas were to be covered with designs. Some needles were attached to wooden handles.

Ink was made by several methods. Some plants produce a highly acidic juice, which could be used for tattoos marking the death of a loved one, that would last six months to a year. If permanent tattoos were desired, an intense black ink would be made of the burned soot of the kukui nut. Arago noted in 1819 that kukui soot was mixed with juice from coconuts and sugar cane to attain a workable consistency. Fish bones charred with kukui oil and burning sandalwood chips might also be pounded into ash and added to the juice from the root of a plant called naneleau to make a pigment for tattooing.

In his journal, Arago described the process of applying a tattoo: They fix the bone of some bird to a stick, slit the bone in the middle, so as to give it two or three points, which they dip in a black colour…they apply these points to the part to be tattooed, and then they strike gently on the stick, to which the bone is attached, with a wand, two feet in length. Moli (tattoo needles) dating from 1200 to 1300 were discovered in a shelter near Hanauma Bay on Oahu in 1958, but such artifacts are extremely rare.

Historians have determined that anyone could have a tattoo, but often it was the more affluent who were the most extensively adorned, possibly because a skilled tattoo master had to be paid, and poor people could not afford his services. Hula dancers, both men and women were usually generously tattooed. Women often had tattoos on their fingers, hands, and wrists and frequently wore band-type decorations on their ankles and lower calves. Queen Kaahumanu was known to be tattooed on her legs, the palm of her left hand and her tongue. Palm tattoos have been recovered on mummified remains.

Jacques Arago wrote (The women) make drawings of necklaces and garters on the skin in a manner really wonderful; their other devises consist of the horns, helmets, muskets, rings, but more particularly fans and goats. Those of the men were muskets, cannon, goats and dominos; together with the name of Tammeahmah (Kamehameha), and the day of his death.

Hawaiian tattoos were applied under strict religious rules. It was an art attended by ritualistic ceremony, and often the designs chosen had kaona, or hidden meaning and power. Today, with a resurgence of Hawaiian pride, tattoos are becoming increasingly common. Its one of the few ancient art forms that is truly Polynesian in origin which has spread throughout the world.

“Readers may submit editorial comments to any of our stories by sending an email to les@lbdcoffee.com. We would be happy to attach your comments and feedback to anything we publish online. Thank you for your interest.”

Story appeared originally in Coffee Times print magazine and appears online for archival purposes only. Any use or reprinting of these stories without the expressed written consent of the author is prohibited.

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Body Art – Hawaiian and Polynesian tattooing

Jan
30

Dynamic Studios Tattoo Kelowna | Tattoo Kelowna BC Canada

Dynamic Studios Tattoo in Kelowna, BC CANADA

Kelowna tattoo studio, Dynamic Studios now features four award winning tattoo artists!

From your first tattoo to a new addition to your growing collection of tattoos, our shop (located downtown Kelowna on Bernard Ave) is home to some very talented tattoo artists, specializing in realism tattoos, and custom fantasy pieces, including burgeoning artist Ryan Scarpino a.k.a. Newz and is one of the most well-established and best tattoo shops in Kelowna, BC. We have very loyal customers and once you give us a try you are sure to know why. With the dynamic environment of our studio, our personalized treatment and exceptional custom pieces plus art / artwork and apparel, we aim to be your first choice and would love to see you back time and time again for tattooing and more.

We are open regular hours 5 days a week and by appointment on Mondays. All staff are blood borne pathogens trained. To book a consultation or an appointment or if you just have questions give us a call today at 250-717-5654 and lets talk.

You can also find our shop as well as our artists on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube and Instagram. Connect with us wherever you do social media and be on the lookout for social media-exclusive offers and keep up with our latest designs, creations and services or festival, conference and convention appearances by our artists.

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Dynamic Studios Tattoo Kelowna | Tattoo Kelowna BC Canada

Jan
30

I am HIV positive, what is the risk if I want a tattoo …

I am HIV positive, what is the risk if I want a tattoo?

13 May 2010. Related: All topics.

Can you offer any advice for someone who is HIV positive and wanting to get a tattoo with regard to risk factors, precautions etc. Is it better to wait until my CD4 count is above a certain number? Does it really matter? Im taking HIV medication with an undetectable viral load and CD4 count of 243 at my last lab results.

Thanks.

Answer: Charlotte Walker

Thank you for your question.

There are some things to consider when deciding to get a tattoo. The most important thing is to make sure you do not get any additional infections. Try to use a reputable tattoo artist who uses single use ink pots and disposable needles and tubing. This way you can protect yourself from other infections such as hepatitis C.

Your CD4 count should not make any difference to you having the tattoo. However, if your CD4 count is very low, like below 100, it may mean you are more vulnerable to infections from the wound until the tattoo has properly healed.

As with any tattoo whether you are HIV positive or not, the after care is also important to make sure you do not get any skin infections from the wound. Following the aftercare advice of your tattoo artist is very important.

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I am HIV positive, what is the risk if I want a tattoo …

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