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Date registered: July 9, 2010

Latest posts

  1. Tattoo Shop Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com — June 5, 2019
  2. How To Tattoo Guides – Tattooing Guides — June 2, 2019
  3. Linked to ink: Tattoo artists raise awareness about human … — May 29, 2019
  4. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ – Reading Group Choices — May 28, 2019
  5. Horror Short Review: The Tattooist (2019) – gbhbl.com — May 28, 2019

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Jun
05

Tattoo Shop Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com

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Kiss of Ink Tattoo

Trenton, NJ 08609 (Wilbur area)

$50,000 – $75,000 a year

Kiss of Ink Tattoo is hiring for our busy shops 3 Studio spots available in New Jersey. 3 studio spots available in Virginia….

Ink’d Society Tattoo Shop

Woodbridge, NJ

$40,000 – $80,000 a year

We are the first tattoo shop to open in North Brunswick Township. Two years minimum shop experience is required not including apprenticeship….

Paws & Anchor

Bradley Beach, NJ 07720

$20,000 – $30,000 a year

Have the luxury and freedom if it pleases you, to have visible tattoos and any hair color. Find your happiness working at an independent business, in a…

Easily apply to this job without a resume

Gift shop discounts. All visible tattoos must be covered. Join one of America’s most award-winning inns and restaurants, The Inn at Little Washington, located…

Kunce Tattoo

Chicago, IL 60608 (Lower West Side area)

Kunce Tattoo is looking for a friendly, motivated, talented and licensed tattoo artist to join our team. Cleanliness is CRUCIAL 2-5+ years SHOP experience….

Celebrity Tattoo

Denver, CO 80215

We are a fast pace tattoo shop looking for Artists, Piercers, receptionist, and apprentices. Artists and piercers need to have 2+ years in a shop and a solid…

Alans coolink

Alans Coolink is a family owned tattoo and piercing shop located in Destin. They would be responsible to answer the phones, assist the artists with scheduling…

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Make Luck Tattoo

$60,000 – $100,000 a year

Redondo Beach 1st tattoo shop looking to add another tattoo artist. Looking for clean, professional,friendly,experienced artist for our busy shop blocks to the…

Ink’d Society Tattoo Shop

$40,000 – $80,000 a year

We are the first tattoo shop to open in North Brunswick Township. Two years minimum shop experience is required not including apprenticeship….

Blackinc tattoo

$300 – $500 a day

Tattoo Artist for shop in Carson California. We are currently looking to grow as a shop. Ideally we are looking for someone who is willing to come in when the…

Freaky’s Smoke Shop & Tattoo III

Now hiring at 9205 N Washington Street,…

Ink Spot Tattoo – Ybor City Tampa

Now hiring at 1527 East 7th Avenue,…

Would you like to make a difference in what consumers shop for? Tattoos must not be visible while the associate is engaged in their work assignments….

Redink Tattoo Studio

$30,000 – $60,000 a year

We are looking for someone with shop experience. We are looking for a NYC licensed artist with minimum of 10 years tattoo experience….

Easily apply to this job without a resume

Red Rose Tattooing Company

$40,000 – $70,000 a year

We have booth available for a commission tattoo artist. Feel free to contact the shop directly for more information and to schedule an interview….

We’d love to see your weird tattoo of peg-legged pirates drinking shakes. Show up on time, work hard when it’s busy, busy yourself around the shop when it’s not…

Hand Forged Tattoo

Bricktown, NJ

$0 a year

For 10 years owner David Long worked At Timeless Tattoo, number one tattoo shop in Atlanta since 1995. We are a busy new shop that is getting busier every day….

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Tattoo Artist salaries in United States

$50,984 per year

Indeed Salary Estimate

Please note that all salary figures are approximations based upon third party submissions to Indeed. These figures are given to the Indeed users for the purpose of generalized comparison only. Minimum wage may differ by jurisdiction and you should consult the employer for actual salary figures.

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Tattoo Shop Jobs, Employment | Indeed.com

Jun
02

How To Tattoo Guides – Tattooing Guides

Proper Tattoo Knowledge and Learning Starts With You

TOP BESTSELLER | #1 ONLINE TATTOOING COURSE!

Every new tattoo artist has to start somewhere. And the best place to start is with the right knowledge and information that they can refer to time and time again.

Im talking about a one-stop tattooing coursse that covers it all, including all the tiny details that make a tattoo artist great. Well, that course has finally arrived in the form of Elite Tattoo Pro.

This jam-packed instructional course is what every new tattoo artist needs to get on the right path. Just about every detail of tattooing is covered in this comprehensive course from where to start, how to setup a tattoo machine, proper needle groupings, shading, coloring, safety practices, how to practice, landing an apprenticeship, troubleshooting, and even the best tattoo inks and machines to buy!

Its all in there. EliteTattooPro.com

Success! Now check your email to confirm your subscription.

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How To Tattoo Guides – Tattooing Guides

May
29

Linked to ink: Tattoo artists raise awareness about human …

Tattoo artists hear all kinds of stories.”There’s stories behind every tattoo, and they’re important to everybody,” tattoo artist and studio owner Mel Judkins said.The bond between artist and client could not be more sacred than in a tattoo chair.”Some of them do open up and tell their stories,” Judkins said.Judkins, who owns Black Squirrel Tattoo in Omaha and has been tattooing for almost 20 years, will never forget the story she heard last year, when a sex trafficking survivor walked into her shop.”She had the name of the trafficker, she had dollar signs,” Judkins said, describing the woman’s chest tattoo.This particular client had been branded- a technique that law enforcement officers see often in trafficking cases.”These traffickers don’t see these victims as victims, they don’t even necessarily see them as human, they see them as a commodity or as a product,” Nebraska State Patrol Lt. Eric Kauffman said.Picking up on the subtle clues like names, dollar signs, crowns and other symbols of power can be difficult.”When you don’t know the relationship or the story behind it and they don’t really tell you, it’s a difficult position to put the artist in,” Judkins said.That’s why Judkins and other local artists, along with UNMC, helped organize a conference that will take place Thursday to educate front-line workers on trafficking’s link to ink.”They talk about law enforcement being the front line in these types of battles- we’re not,” Kauffman said, “it’s the public.”Beyond what’s being tattooed, Kauffman says behavior can be a red flag.”It’s something that dehumanizes them, they don’t wanna talk about it, they don’t have a story to share, those are the things that we need to pick up on and report,” Kauffman said.For prisoners in their own skin, tattoo artists like Judkins are liberators.That’s exactly what Judkins would rather be, telling KETV she’s done free work to cover up trafficking victims’ tattoos.”It’s fulfilling emotionally and morally just to know that person can take a sigh of relief when they look in the mirror again, and you had a part in that,” Judkins said. The first annual Heritage Tattoo Conference begins at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 23, at the Old Mattress Factory Bar and Grill in downtown Omaha. Doors open at 9:30 a.m.The event is hosted by the University of Nebraska Medical Center- College of Public Health, and is free to attendees during the morning sessions.World-renowned tattoo artist and painter, Gunnar, will speak during the morning session along with Dr. Shireen Rajaram, who will give a presentation on the links between the tattoo industry and human trafficking.The Council Bluffs Tattoo Arts Convention begins the next day, Friday, at the Mid-America Center. More information on the convention can be found here.

Tattoo artists hear all kinds of stories.

“There’s stories behind every tattoo, and they’re important to everybody,” tattoo artist and studio owner Mel Judkins said.

The bond between artist and client could not be more sacred than in a tattoo chair.

“Some of them do open up and tell their stories,” Judkins said.

Judkins, who owns Black Squirrel Tattoo in Omaha and has been tattooing for almost 20 years, will never forget the story she heard last year, when a sex trafficking survivor walked into her shop.

“She had the name of the trafficker, she had dollar signs,” Judkins said, describing the woman’s chest tattoo.

This particular client had been branded- a technique that law enforcement officers see often in trafficking cases.

“These traffickers don’t see these victims as victims, they don’t even necessarily see them as human, they see them as a commodity or as a product,” Nebraska State Patrol Lt. Eric Kauffman said.

Picking up on the subtle clues like names, dollar signs, crowns and other symbols of power can be difficult.

“When you don’t know the relationship or the story behind it and they don’t really tell you, it’s a difficult position to put the artist in,” Judkins said.

That’s why Judkins and other local artists, along with UNMC, helped organize a conference that will take place Thursday to educate front-line workers on trafficking’s link to ink.

“They talk about law enforcement being the front line in these types of battles- we’re not,” Kauffman said, “it’s the public.”

Beyond what’s being tattooed, Kauffman says behavior can be a red flag.

“It’s something that dehumanizes them, they don’t wanna talk about it, they don’t have a story to share, those are the things that we need to pick up on and report,” Kauffman said.

For prisoners in their own skin, tattoo artists like Judkins are liberators.

That’s exactly what Judkins would rather be, telling KETV she’s done free work to cover up trafficking victims’ tattoos.

“It’s fulfilling emotionally and morally just to know that person can take a sigh of relief when they look in the mirror again, and you had a part in that,” Judkins said.

The first annual Heritage Tattoo Conference begins at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 23, at the Old Mattress Factory Bar and Grill in downtown Omaha. Doors open at 9:30 a.m.

The event is hosted by the University of Nebraska Medical Center- College of Public Health, and is free to attendees during the morning sessions.

World-renowned tattoo artist and painter, Gunnar, will speak during the morning session along with Dr. Shireen Rajaram, who will give a presentation on the links between the tattoo industry and human trafficking.

The Council Bluffs Tattoo Arts Convention begins the next day, Friday, at the Mid-America Center. More information on the convention can be found here.

AlertMe

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Linked to ink: Tattoo artists raise awareness about human …

May
28

THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ – Reading Group Choices

1. How did you feel about Lale when he was first introduced, as he arrived in Auschwitz? How did your understanding of him change throughout the novel?

2. What qualities did Lale have that influenced the way he was treated in the camp? Where did those qualities come from?

3. Survival in the camp depended on people doing deeds of questionable morality. Lale became the tattooist, but how did Gitas choices affect her survival? What about her friend who befriended a Nazi?

4. Inmates in the concentration camp had to make life-or-death decisions every day. Why did some make the right decisions and survive while others did not?

5. Discuss some of the small acts of humanity carried out by individuals in The Tattooist of Auschwitz. How did these small acts of kindness have greater implications? Did it make you reconsider what you believe to be brave or heroic? Did this make you think differently about the impact of your own everyday actions?

6. The Tattooist of Auschwitz makes clear that there were also non-Jewish prisoners in the camp. How did the treatment of Jews differ from that of non-Jews? How did differences manifest themselves?

7. Had Gita and Lale met in a more conventional way, would they have developed the same kind of relationship? How did their circumstances change the course of their romance?

8. In what ways were the relationships between Gita and her friends different from the usual friendships between teenage girls? In what ways were they similar?

9. In what ways was Lale a hero? In what ways was he an ordinary man?

10. Lale faced danger even after the camp was liberated. How did his experiences immediately after liberation prepare him for the rest of his life?

11. How does The Tattooist of Auschwitz change your perceptions about the Holocaust in particular, and war in general? What implications does this book hold for our own time?

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THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ – Reading Group Choices

May
28

Horror Short Review: The Tattooist (2019) – gbhbl.com

Michael Wong is a Malaysian film director currently residing in Beijing, China. He has a new micro-short (The Tattooist) currently making its round at the horror film festival circuit. As well as winning a number of international accolades. Winner at Canadas Bloody Horror International Film Festival, Horrorhaus Film Festival in LA, Canadas Terror in the Bay Film Festival and multiple wins at Diabolical Horror Film Festival, nominee at Vancouver Badass Film Festival, to name just a few.

The Tattooist follows the dark obsessions of a tattooist whose studio is acclaimed for its exceptional and intricately crafted tattoos. Those who receive his prized masterpiece are drugged, imprisoned, and then forced to fight their fears in a race against the clock to escape. Can they escape or will they become victims of The Tattooist?

Not even a minute and a half, The Tattooist is fast and loose. Blending horror and art, its a wonderfully shot and colourful looking thing. Its also really harrowing as we get these sharp and fast cuts between horrendous imagery of torture and suffering.

In such a short amount of time, Wong manages to tell a complete story. We see the tattooist at work, we see his dungeon and the pain he inflicts on his victim before leaving us with a shot of the mysterious man dancing while doing his work. It conjures up his evil and just how much he clearly enjoys what he does. It will leave you feeling cold.

Very impressive. From the way in which Wong captures the horror but also the excellent performances from Troys Team Action and amazing music by Found In The Attic. The moment it ends, youll want it watch it again and again to drink in the wonderful horror.

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Horror Short Review: The Tattooist (2019) – gbhbl.com

May
28

Tattooing from #A to #Z: Zeke Owen "Tattoo Zeke" | Tattoo Life

Zeke Owen, or, as he is better known, Tattoo Zeke, was born in 1940 and was the first person to re-open tattooing in Guam, since his uncle, Ernie Sutton, opened his shop there in the 1950s. Zeke Owen started tat- tooing on the Pike in 1957.

The Pike is considered one of the West Coasts historical tattoo sites thanks to Bert Grimm & Bob Shaw, two legends of tattooing. Zeke was part of that crew till, a few years later, he opened his own shop in Rachael and Punchys Terminal Cafe in Agana.

Zeke moved to Joe Blas Tavern towards Tamuniing and later back to Hawaii. He started Ed Hardy in the business, in San Diego, many years ago. When he worked at 1033 Hotel St. in Hawaii, on military paydays, Zeke would work nights with Sailor Jerry Collins, around the corner on Smith St., after Jonny Walker left Jerrys. Mike Malone worked at Zekes shop in San Diego, when it was called The Ace Tattooing Company. Hardy and Owen had a shop together in San Diego, for a few years. He has worked at many of the older shops in the US, with Kazuo Oguri (aka Hori Hide), in Gifu City, Japan and with almost everyone in New York City, including Jonathan Shaw. This is just a hint as to the provenance of Zeke Owen, one of the tattoo industrys bona fide heroes.

Zeke was on one of the forerunners of early Japanese Style tattooing in America. He has spent decades on the road doing guest spots at tattoo shops from Georgia to Alaska, tattooing collectors, spinning yarns, and selling antique tattoo art & stencils. Owens charisma, wit, lifestyle and encyclopedic memory of tattoo legends and lore was captured in his popular Ask Zeke, columns in Skin&Ink magazine, some of which are reprinted on the website tattooroadtrip.com blog.

His influence on the tattoo community is immeasurable. Others have tried to follow and failed, because when they made Zeke Owen, they broke the mold. The stories about him are endless. Back in the day, he was what tattooing was all about: being a tough survivor in an outlaw business based on art. Sadly, one of the most common issues plaguing tattoo artists from every generation is the serious lack of medical coverage and retirement options available to independent, blue collar craftsmen & women in the profession. From basic medical coverage to disability, these are real-world concerns for tens of thousands of professional tattoo artists, all across the world.

Recently, the tattoo community was made aware of Zeke Owens medical situation, and came together to help raise more than $25,000 to help pay for this amazing mans Alzheimers treatment and his nursing home. We love you, Tattoo Zeke!

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Tattooing from #A to #Z: Zeke Owen "Tattoo Zeke" | Tattoo Life

May
25

Miami Ink Tattoo Shop | LoveToKnow

The Miami Ink Tattoo shop was the site of TLC’s previous hit show, Miami Ink. While the original shop has since shut its doors, the same tattoo artists are still working together to provide a great tattooing experience, at a new shop just down the road.

The recognition from the Miami Ink television show created an incredible buzz for the now-famous tattoo shop, though both the location and name have changed.

The shop was originally named 305 Tattoo, though thanks to the show’s success it changed its name to Miami Ink. This location has since closed. Although the Miami Ink tattoo shop has since closed, there is no need to fear missing out on the Miami Ink experience; the same artists you loved to watch from the show have opened up their own lounge and tattoo shop right across the street.

The new location is larger than the previous one. The artists needed a larger workspace in order to better suit the amount of clients they have been getting since the debut of the Miami Ink reality television show. The name of the shop was changed (for unspecified reasons) and is now called Love Hate Tattoo Studio.

The Love Hate Tattoo Shop is located right up the street from the old 305 Tattoo shop, making it easy for old customers and new fans alike to visit the studio for tattoo art.

The current address for the Love Hate Tattoo Studio is 1360 Washington Avenue in Miami, Florida.

The studio is open 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. each day.

If you would like to ask about rates or just keep up on the news of the shop, you can contact the studio in the following ways:

305 Tattoo, aka Miami Ink, became famous in the world of tattoo for one good reason – great artists. The work that the shop was (and still is) putting out was more indicative of fine art than what many people associated with tattoos before the television show brought recognition to the shop.

The artists assembled here are very good with all styles of tattoos, but they excel in portrait work. Many of the artists from the Miami Ink show are all still present at the shop, and they also bring in guest artists from time to time. The lineup consists of:

Getting inked by artists that helped revolutionize tattooing is potentially a great thrill. Expect the cost of a tat from Love Hate Tattoo Studio to be top dollar, and be sure to call for an appointment before going. The shop handles many styles of tattoos from full sleeves and lower back tattoos to the very popular “urban” style. Whatever you want done, this talented group of artists can do it for you in a quality that you will be proud to show everyone.

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Miami Ink Tattoo Shop | LoveToKnow

May
25

Best Tattoo in Minneapolis – Uptown Tattoo in Minneapolis …

If you ask around Minneapolis where the best place is to get tattooed, chances are someone will mention Uptown Tattoo. The artists that reside at this shop have their work displayed on human canvasses throughout Minnesota. As the most frequented tattoo shop in the state, Uptown Tattoo has a reputation of quality and trust among its clients. The artists are professional and personable, building strong relationships with their clients before creating permanent impressions on their bodies. Much of their business comes from word of mouth, and their steady stream of clients proves that they have thoroughly satisfied their customers.

Uptown Tattoo has turned out some of the greatest designs and artwork in the country. Those who live in Minnesota are fortunate to have these incredibly talented artists in their own backyard. Clients travel from far and wide to have their tattoo work completed by some of the best artists in the country.

Uptown Tattoo is the favorite tattoo shop of Minneapolis. Uptown Tattoo in Minneapolis is not only known for its talented artists, but also for their impeccable quality of work. Consultations and walk-ins are welcome.

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Best Tattoo in Minneapolis – Uptown Tattoo in Minneapolis …

May
24

Lyle Tuttle, Who Recast Tattooings Image Pore by Pore, Dies …

Lyle Tuttle, a tattoo artist who found his own kind of international fame by catering to celebrities while helping to move tattooing, as he put it, from the back alley into mainstream acceptability, died on March 26 at his home in Ukiah, Calif., where he had grown up. He was 87 (and practically covered in tattoos himself).

Danielle Boiardi, the curator and manager of the Lyle Tuttle Collection, said Mr. Tuttle had been in hospice care after an inoperable growth was discovered in his throat about two weeks before he died.

These days tattoos are commonplace, inspiring clothing lines and museum shows and adorning people from all walks of life, most publicly actors, athletes and musicians. But when Mr. Tuttle first took up the needle in the late 1940s, tattoos were practically unheard-of in polite society, more associated with sailors, criminals and sideshow freaks.

Mr. Tuttle had been a tattoo enthusiast both as an artist and as a recipient since he was a teenager. He was mentored in the 1950s by storied tattooists like Bert Grimm, and he worked in the trade in California and in Alaska before he opened his own shop in San Francisco in 1960, wanting to get tattooing out of the back alley, as he told The San Francisco Chronicle in 2002.

His shop became a popular destination for members of the San Francisco counterculture during the 1960s, and by the end of the decade he was being sought out by the likes of Janis Joplin, Joan Baez, the Allman Brothers, Peter Fonda and Cher.

Janis was a wild and crazy girl I put a bracelet and a little heart on her breast, he recalled in 2006 in an interview with The Columbus Dispatch in Ohio. He said he had given Ms. Baez a small blue flower on her back.

His tattooing of rock stars drew the news medias interest, as did the elaborate designs covering his own body (except for his face, hands and feet). Dozens of well-known tattooists, like Tahiti Felix Lynch and Painless Nell, did the inking. Some of Mr. Grimms standout designs could be found on Mr. Tuttle, including a full back tattoo that showed two eagles squaring off over the title Duel in the Sun, and a coat of arms on his torso that featured a chicken and a feather with a Latin version of the phrase Chicken today, feathers tomorrow.

Photographs of Mr. Tuttle, with the scruffy hair and sideburns of a rock star, appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone and inside Life magazine accompanying an article about the growing popularity of tattoos among women. At one point the elaborate tattoos on his back, arms and torso were reproduced for a long-sleeved shirt, which was said to have sold in the hundreds of thousands.

Spider Webb, another renowned tattooist, said in a telephone interview that he saw Mr. Tuttle as an eloquent spokesman for tattooing.

The breakthrough that he made was in peoples minds, he said, tearing down prejudice, and thats kind of a beautiful thing to do with your life.

Lyle Gilbert Tuttle was born in Chariton, Iowa, on Oct. 7, 1931. His parents, Howard and Opal (Castor) Tuttle, were farmers who later moved to Ukiah to escape drought. His father became a contractor there.

Lyle got his first tattoo at 14, a heart emblazoned with the word Mother, after seeing similar tattoos on servicemen returning from World War II. He paid $3.50 for it in a San Francisco parlor.

For me, guys with tattoos had been someplace or at least out of the valley, he said in 2006, referring to the Ukiah Valley in Northern California.

The tattooist who inked him for the first time was Ralph Kaufman, widely known in San Francisco as Duke. By the late 1940s, having dropped out of high school in Ukiah, Mr. Tuttle was working with him.

After a stint in the Marines during the Korean War, Mr. Tuttle went on to work with Mr. Grimm in Long Beach in the mid-1950s. From there, in 1957, he moved to Alaska, where tattoo artists were rare, and worked for a time in Anchorage and Fairbanks.

Returning to the Bay Area, he worked in Oakland before opening Lyle Tuttle Tattooing in San Francisco. A version of the store, called Lyle Tuttle Tattoo Shop, continues to operate in North Beach.

Mr. Tuttle is survived by his wife, Judy (Aurre) Tuttle, and a daughter, Suzanne Tuttle, from an earlier marriage, to Betty Lawson.

Mr. Tuttle retired for the most part in the early 1990s. But he remained a celebrity to aficionados, appearing at tattoo conventions around the world and sometimes inking fans with a stylized version of his autograph. He signed the last one a week before he died.

He said he had tattooed at least one person on each continent, including Antarctica, and amassed what many enthusiasts consider the worlds largest collection of tattoo-related artifacts and artwork, like versions of tattoo designs on paper. He drew on that collection to open a small museum in San Francisco dedicated to tattoo history. (It has since closed.)

Mr. Tuttle frequently said that he never regretted his own copious tattoos. But he did advise restraint, especially with face and head tattoos, which have become increasingly common.

Its a matter of privacy, he told The Los Angeles Times in 2004. Hey, I look civilized with my clothes on.

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Lyle Tuttle, Who Recast Tattooings Image Pore by Pore, Dies …

May
21

Dr Evil tattooist given 3 years in jail over tongue …

A tattooist known as Dr Evil who removed nipples and performed tongue splitting on clients has been jailed after an ear removal sparked an investigation that resulted in a 40-month jail sentence.

Dr Evil, real name Brendan McCarthy, was sentenced to three years and four months for carrying out procedures such as ear and nipple removals at his studio in Wolverhampton between 2012 and 2015. The controversial modifications were carried out without anaesthetic.

West Midlands Police started an investigation into the tattooist when images of McCarthy cutting off a customers ear circulated online, sparking complaints to the City of Wolverhampton Council.

WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES

McCarthy pled guilty to three counts of causing grievous bodily harm at the Wolverhampton Crown Court last month and was sentenced on Thursday. Media reports state that he screamed when his sentence was read out, and many of his supporters in the court cried.

He had no qualifications to carry out surgical procedures or to deal with any adverse consequences which could have arisen, Judge Amjad Nawaz said. There is a clear public interest element. There is also a need for deterrent.

When he was arrested, McCarthy said he didnt think he had broken the law because his clients had consented to the procedures. He has no medical qualifications and is licensed to carry out piercings and tattoos. Police said he did the modifications without knowing his clients medical or mental health backgrounds, and that they found out-of-date swabs, anaesthetic gel and needles at his studio.

We all gave full consent, we were all happy, he talked us through the procedure, we knew he wasn’t a doctor despite playing on the Austin powers name of Dr Evil, he’s one of the best in the country I had multiple discussions with him about how the industry needs regulation, one of his customers said.

Ezechiel Lott, the man whose ear removal sparked the investigation, told police he hadn’t realised the procedure wasnt legal and felt deceived.

READ MORE: Stag party paid drunk and hungry homeless man to tattoo name & postcode on forehead (VIDEO)

Over 13,000 people signed a petition in support of McCarthy, whose lawyers argued the consent he got from clients was a lawful defense. His case was brought to the Court of Appeal but three judges found the procedures were not the same as tattoos and piercings.

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